Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

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Chris Smither

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Chris Smither

A profound songwriter, Chris Smither draws deeply from the blues, American folk music, modern poets, and philosophers. Reviewers continue to praise his dazzling guitar work, gravelly voice and songwriting. “Smither is an American original – a product of the musical melting pot and one of the absolute best singer-songwriters in the world.”—Associated Press.

Bathed in the flickering glow of passing headlights and neon bar signs, Smither’s roots are as blue as they come. There is plenty of misty Louisiana and Lightnin’ Hopkins in Smither’s weathered singing and unhurried picking. So fine. -- Rolling Stone

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Honing a synthesis of folk and blues for 50 years, Chris Smither is truly an American original.

Recorded at the gorgeous Blue Rock Studio in Texas, Chris' latest studio record of brand new originals in six years (release date: March 2018 on Signature Sounds/Mighty Albert) features producer and multi-instrumentalist David Goodrich, drummer Billy Conway (Morphine), Matt Lorenz (aka The Suitcase Junket), and engineer Keith Gary. Touring in 2018 to support the record, Chris will showcase these fresh new songs that offer commentary on the human condition with a wink of an eye and pulls from deep in the soul, all in his signature Smither style. To complete the project are a couple of surprise covers that remind us of Chris' deftness as a song interpreter as he makes the songs his own.

Reviewers and fans from around the world including Rolling Stone and The New York Times agree that Chris continues to be a profound songwriter, a blistering guitarist, and intense performer as he draws deeply from the blues, American folk music, modern poets and humanist philosophers.  

Born in Miami, during World War II, Chris Smither grew up in New Orleans where he first started playing music as a child. The son of a Tulane University professor, he was taught the rudiments of instrumentation by his uncle on his mother’s ukulele. “Uncle Howard,” Smither says, “showed me that if you knew three chords, you could play a lot of the songs you heard on the radio. And if you knew four chords, you could pretty much rule the world.” With that bit of knowledge under his belt, he was hooked. “I’d loved acoustic music – specifically the blues – ever since I first heard Lightnin’ Hopkins’ Blues In My Bottle album. I couldn’t believe the sound read more.